The Chieftain Clan O'Flaithbheartaigh {O'Flaherty}

The Succession of Connemara's Kings:

 

1. Donn mac Cumasgach

Donn mac Cumasgach, King of Maigh Seóla?, died 752.

Donn mac Cumasgach may be the earliest recorded ruler of Maigh Seóla, referred to as the southern Ui Briuin in his annalistic obituary.

However, Francis John Byrne casts down on the relationship between the Uí Briúin and the dynasty of Maigh Seóla, believing it to be one of political alliance, and dating from the 10th century at that. By then, the rulers of Maigh Seóla had acquired the name Muintir Murchada.

Not till 848 would another king of the region, Maelan mac Cathmogha, be named. Donn does not seem to appear in any of the extant genealogies, nor does anything else seem to be known of him.

Preceded by
?
King of Maigh Seóla
?–752

Succeeded by
Maelan mac Cathmogha

2. Maelan mac Cathmogha

Maelan mac Cathmogha (died 848) was King of Maigh Seóla.

Maelan appears to be one of the earliest recorded kings of the territory of Maigh Seola, later known as Uí Briúin Seóla. He is not recorded in the genealogies, of which Francis John Byrne has this to say:

The Uí Briúin pedigrees show every sign of falsification ... Uí Briúin Seóla of the Tuam area in County Galway ... trace their separate descent though lines of unrecorded or dubious ancestors to Brión or his suppositious son Dauí (Dauí Tenga Uma) in the fifth century; ... such an adoption guaranteed them the tribute-free status of sáer-thuatha and ensured that Uí Briúin power should stretch from the Shannon to Clew Bay.

Thus it would appear that Maelan, and by implication his possible descendants, the Muintir Murchada, were political allies and not blood-relatives of the Uí Briúin. Maigh Seola was surrounded to the east by the Soghain and the Uí Maine; to the south Máenmaige and the Uí Fiachrach Aidhne; to the west by the Delbhna Tir Dha Locha; to the north and far north-west, the Conmhaícne.

 The Conmhaicne or Conmaicne were an ancient tribal grouping that were divided into a number of distinct branches that were found scattered around Ireland in the early medieval period. They settled in Connacht, where they gave their name to several territories.

They take their name from a mythical ancestor known as Conmac. Conmac was in turn said to be descended from Fergus mac Roich and Queen Maeve of Connacht.

The word Conmacne means "progeny of Conmac" (ne, a progeny). Conmac itself means "hound-son" (con, hound; mac, son).

Known branches were:

  • Conmaicne Mara (the Conmaicne of the sea) were located in what is now the extreme west of County Galway and gave their name to the territory they occupied i.e. Connemara, which is the anglicised form of Conmhaicne Mara.
  • Conmaicne Maenmaigh, located around the former parish of Kilconickny, Loughrea. Kilconickny means "church of the Conmaicne".
  • Conmaicne Críche Meic Erca, location apparently unknown.

The Diocese of Ardagh was established in 1111 as the see for east Connacht. At the Synod of Kells-Mellifont its area was reduced to the territory of the Conmaicne with the kingdom of Breifne forming a new Diocese of Kells.[1]

Notables descended from the Conmhaicne include Cruimthear Mac Carthaigh, Iarlaith of Tuam and some abbots of Clonmacnoise.

The Viking Wars

In the first half of the 9th century, Ireland experienced raids by Vikings. Some occurred in Connacht:

  • 812 - A slaughter of the heathens by the men of Umall (Clew Bay). A slaughter of the Conmhaícne by the heathens.
  • 813 - The slaughter at Umall by the heathens in which fell Coscrach son of Flannabra and Dúnadach, king of Umall.
  • 835 -All the country of Connaught was likewise desolated by them.
  • 837 - A battle was gained by the Gentiles over the Connaughtmen, wherein was slain Maelduin, son of Muirgius mac Tommaltaig, with numbers of others along with him.
  • 843 - An expedition by Turgesius, lord of the foreigners, upon Loch Ribh (Lough Ree, so that they plundered Connaught and Meath, and burned Cluain Mic Nois (Clonmacnoise, with its oratories, Cluain Fearta Brenainn, (Clonfert), Tir Da Ghlas (Terryglass), Lothra (Lorrha), and many others in like manner.
  • 844 - A battle was gained over the Connaughtmen by the foreigners, in which Riagan, son of Fearghus; Mughron, son of Diarmaid; and Aedh, son of Catharnach, with many others, were slain.
  • 847 - A fleet of seven score ships of the people of the king of the foreigners came to contend with the foreigners that were in Ireland before them, so that they disturbed Ireland between them.

During one such episode in 848, Maelan was slain by the foreigners. He is anachronistically referred to as lord of Ui Briuin of South Connaught.

Preceded by
Donn mac Cumasgach?
King of Maigh Seóla
?–891
Succeeded by
Murchadh mac Maenach

3. Murchadh mac Maenach

Murchadh mac Maenach (died 891) was King of Maigh Seóla.

Murchadh is one of the earliest attested kings of his region. He is noteworthy as the person who gave his name to the Muintir Murchada, a dynasty who's leading family later took the surname Ó Flaithbertaigh (O'Flaherty). At this point in time, his people lived east of Lough Corrib, their territory centered around Lough Cime (Lough Hackett), Tuam, County Galway. They would be expelled by the O'Connors in the 1050s.

The genealogies list two sons, Urchadh and Urumhain, with Urchadh listed as having descendants. A Cleirchin mac Murchadh of Uí Briúin Seóla is listed in the Annals of the Four Masters under 908, though he does not appear in any other source. Urchadh later became the grandfather of Brian Boru.

According to the genealogies, Murchard's great-great-great-greatgrandson was Flaithbheartaigh mac Emhin, who's grandson, Muredach Mór Ua Flaithbheartaigh, apparently became the first to bear the surname. Muredach Mór had three sons - Ruaidri of Lough Cime, Donough Aluinn and Aedh. From Ruaidri are the senior lines of the clan (those of Conmaicne Mara (latter known as Connemara), Moycullen and Sliocht Diarmaid)

Preceded by
Maelan mac Cathmogha
King of Maigh Seóla
848?–891
Succeeded by
Cléirchén mac Murchadh

4. Cleirchen mac Murchadh

Cléirchén mac Murchadh (died 908) was King of Maigh Seóla.

Cléirchén appears only in the annals, and is not listed in any extant genealogies, so it is unknown if he had any descendants. He was the first of two sons of Murchadh mac Maenach to rule the kingdom. His name does not appear again in any branch of the Muintir Murchada. It did however appear as a surname among the neighbouring dynasty of Uí Fiachrach Aidhne by the 920's. It was the name of an obscure hermit (Cléircheán of Saintclerans) in the latter territory.

Preceded by
Murchadh mac Maenach
King of Maigh Seóla
891908
Succeeded by
Urchadh mac Murchadh

5. Urchadh mac Murchadh

Urchadh mac Murchadh (died 943) was King of Maigh Seóla.

Urchadh is one of the earliest attested king of Uí Briúin Seóla, who's rulers also seems to have exercised some authority over Iar Connacht. His dynasty, the Muintir Murchada, took their name from his father, Murchadh mac Maenach. The Ó Flaithbertaigh family would later claim him as an ancestor.

Urchadh had an elder brother called Urumhain or Earca. Nothing else seems to be known of him.

In addition to his son and successor, Donnchadh, he had three known daughters who achieved notable marriages - Bé Binn inion Urchadh; Creassa inion Urchadh; Caineach inion Urchadh

Preceded by
Cléirchén mac Murchadh
King of Maigh Seóla
891?–943
Succeeded by
Donnchadh mac Urchadh

Be Binn inion Urchadh                                    *~Queen~*

Bé Binn inion Urchadh Princess of the Uí Briúin Seóla and Queen of Thomond, fl. early 10th century.

Bé Binn was a daughter of King Urchadh mac Murchadh of Maigh Seóla (reigned 891?-943). She was married to King Cennétig mac Lorcáin of Thomond (died 951). Cennétig is known to have had as many as eleven sons and at least one daughter, Órlaith íngen Cennétig (Queen of Ireland, died 941). The only child positively assigned to her by Cennétig - who had a number of wives - was High King of Ireland, Brian Boru (c. 941–23 April 1014). This makes Bé Binn ancestor to all subsequent Dál gCais O'Brien's and their offshoots.

After the death of Cennétig, she appears to have been remarried to a king of the Corco Modhruadh (Corcomroe), a region in north-west County Clare. By him she had Lochlann and Conchobar, ancestors of the Ó Lochlainn and Ó Conchubhair Corcomroe.

Her sister Creassa inion Urchadh was a wife of King Tadg mac Cathail of Connacht, while another sister, Caineach inion Urchadh, appears to have married the ancestor of the Clann Coscraig sept of the Uí Briúin Seóla. Her brother, Donnchadh, succeeded their father as king.

Creassa inion Urchadh                                      *~Queen~*

Creassa inion Urchadh Princess of the Uí Briúin Seóla and Queen of Connacht, fl. early 10th century.

Creassa was a daughter of King Urchadh mac Murchadh of Maigh Seóla (reigned 891?-943). She was married to King Tadg mac Cathail of Connacht (reigned 925-956). By him, she had sons Conchobar mac Tadg, Máel Ruanaid Mór mac Tadg and Tadg.

Each of her three sons would found important Connacht dynasties; Máel Ruanaid Mór's would become Kings of Moylurg, while Tadg's descendants would become royal marshals and bodyguards of the kings of Connacht, such as Fearghal Ó Taidg an Teaghlaigh.

The most notable would descend from Conchobar, whose descendants would take his name as their surname, O'Connor. This line of the family would remain Kings of Connacht into the 15th century; two of them - Toirdelbach Ua Conchobair (1088-1156) and Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair (d. 1198) - would become High Kings of Ireland.

Her sisters Bé Binn inion Urchadh and Caineach inion Urchadh similarly made good marriages, while her brother, Donnchadh mac Urchadh was King of Maigh Seóla (943-959). He was the ancestor of the O'Flaherty family and their related septs.

Caineach union Urchadh                                   *~Queen~*

Caineach inion Urchadh Princess of the Uí Briúin Seóla and Queen of Connacht, fl. early 10th century.

Caineach was one of three daughters of King Urchadh mac Murchadh of Maigh Seóla (died 943). She became the wife of a prince of the Síol Muiredaig, and thus an ancestor of the Clann Coscraig sept of the dynasty.

She was an aunt of three notable Irish rulers:

6. Donnchadh mac Urchadh

Donnchadh mac Urchadh (died 959) was King of Maigh Seóla.

Nothing certain seems to be known of Donnchadh, though he would have been an uncle of Brian Boru. He is not listed in the genealogies.

Preceded by
Urchadh mac Murchadh
King of Maigh Seóla
943959
Succeeded by
Murchad mac Flann mac Glethneachan

7. Murchad mac Flann mac Glethneachan

Murchad mac Flann mac Glethneachan, King of Maigh Seóla, fl. 973.

All that is known of Murchad is contained in an entry in the Annals of the Four Masters, sub anno 973, the year Murchadh Glunillar ua Flaithbheartach, King of Aileach, invaded Connacht and gave battle to King Cathal mac Tadg at Ceis Corran. Cathal was killed as were some of his prime vassals - "Geibheannach, son of Aedh, lord of Ui-Maine; Tadhg, son of Muircheartach, chief of Ui-Diarmada; Murchadh, son of Flann, son of Glethneachan, chief of Clann-Murchadha; and Seirridh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, with a countless number along with them."

Murchadh totally plundered Connaught afterwards, while Cathal was succeeded as King of Connacht by Cathal mac Conchobar mac Taidg.

Preceded by
Donnchadh mac Urchadh
King of Maigh Seóla
973
Succeeded by
Maelcairearda

8. Maelcairearda

Maelcairearda (died 993) was King of Uí Briúin Seóla.

There is uncertainty over the succession between Murchad mac Flann mac Glethneachan and Brian. A Maelcairearda King of Uí Briúin, is recorded in the annals as dying in 993 but this may refer to Uí Briúin proper, or indeed its offshoots. In the O'Flaherty genealogies, he is given as the father of Muireadhach ua Flaithbheartach (died 1034).

A notable event took place on the crannog home of Muintir Murchada, at Lough Cimbe (now Lough Hackett) in 991:

The wind sunk the island of Loch Cimbe suddenly, with its dreach and rampart, i.e. thirty feet.

Preceded by
Murchad mac Flann mac Glethneachan
King of Uí Briúin Seóla
?–993
Succeeded by
Brian mac Maelruanaidh

9. Brian mac Maelruanaidh

Brian mac Maelruanaidh (died 1003) was King of Maigh Seóla.

All that is known for certain of Brian is contained in his obit, dated 1003:

Brian, son of Maelruanaidh, lord of West Connaught, was slain by his own people

In that year, "the Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne aided by West Connaught fought a battle against the Uí Maine" and "the men of West Meath ... wherein fell Gillaceallaigh, son of Comhaltan Ua Cleirigh, lord of Ui-Fiachrach; Conchobhar, son of Ubban; Ceannfaeladh, son of Ruaidhri, and many others. Finn, son of Marcan, Tanist of Ui-Maine, fell in the heat of the conflict."

It is not known if this conflict had any role in Brian's assassination. Both the Muintir Murchada and Uí Fiachrach Aidhne were allied with Brian Boru, who was the son of a daughter of Urchadh mac Murchadh.

Preceded by
Maelcairearda
King of Maigh Seóla
993?–1003
Succeeded by
Muireadhach ua Flaithbheartach

10. Muireadhach ua Flaithbheartach

Muireadhach ua Flaithbheartach (died 1034) was King of Maigh Seóla.

The Annals of Inisfallen state 1027 - Muiredach Ua Flaithbertaig besieged Cathal, son of Ruaidrí, on Inis Crema in Loch Oirbsen, and divided his land despite him.

The Chronicon Scotorum states Muiredhach ua Flaitbertaigh king of the Ua mBriuin Sheola was treacherously killed.

Muireadhach was a grandson of Flaithbheartach, hence his suffix, which would become the surname Ua/Ó Flaithbheartaigh/O'Flaherty. The genealogies name his father as Maelcairearda; a person of this name died in 993, listed a king of Uí Briúin, but not explicitly as king of Uí Briúin Seóla. He is listed as having three sons – Ruaidhrí of Lough Cimbe, Donagh Aluinn and Aedh. From Ruaidhrí and Donagh would descended the eastern and western Ó Flaithbheartaigh's of Connemara.

Preceded by
Brian mac Maelruanaidh
King of Maigh Seóla
1003?–1034
Succeeded by
Murchadh an Chapail Ua Flaithbheartaigh

11. Murchadh an Chapail Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Murchadh an Chapail Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1036) was King of Maigh Seóla/Iar Connacht.

Murchadh appears to have been the first to bear the surname Ua/Ó Flaithbheartaigh/O'Flaherty but his tenure as chief was short. The annals state Murchadh Ua an Chapail, i.e. Ua Flaithbheartaigh, and Niall, son of Muirgheas, two royal heirs of West Connaught, were slain. No further details are given.

Preceded by
Muireadhach ua Flaithbheartach
King of Maigh Seóla
10341036
Succeeded by
Cathal mac Ruaidhri

12. Cathal mac Ruaidhri

Cathal mac Ruaidhri (died 1043) was King of Maigh Seóla/Iar Connacht.

Cathal is very obscure. He does not appear in the genealogies nor is his relationship to other members of the Muintir Murchada known. The year after he became king, the annals record that "Cathal, son of Ruaidhri, lord of West Connaught, went on his pilgrimage to Ard-Macha (Armagh)." He appears to have died there in 1043. He was succeeded by his son, Amhalgaidh.

Preceded by
Murchadh an Chapail Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Maigh Seóla
1036–1043
Succeeded by
Amhalgaidh mac Cathal

13. Amhalgaidh mac Cathal

Amhalgaidh mac Cathal (died 1075) was King of Maigh Seóla and Iar Connacht.

Amhalgaidh was the son of the previous king, Cathal mac Ruaidhri, who appears to have died at Armagh in 1043. He was lord in 1051 when the annals state that:

Amhalgaidh, son of Cathal, lord of West Connaught, was blinded by Aedh Ua Conchobhair, lord of East Connaught, after he had been held in captivity for the space of one year and upwards; after which he (Ua Conchobhair) fixed his residence in West Connaught.

The Annals of Inisfallen state that in 1048 Inis Locha Cime was sacked and razed by Ua Conchobuir, king of Connachta.

From this point onwards, the Ua Conchobair kings of Connacht made their residence in Maigh Seola. While they still possessed lands on the east shores of Lough Corrib, the Muintir Murchada began to move into what is now known as Connemara.

Amhalgaidh died in 1075.

Preceded by
Cathal mac Ruaidhri
King of Maigh Seóla
1043?–1051
Succeeded by
Cathal mac Tigernán

14. Cathal mac Tigernan

Cathal mac Tigernán (died 1059) was King of Iar Connacht.

Áed in Gai Bernaig, King of Connacht from 1046 to 1067, had invaded and conquored Maigh Seóla in 1051, blinding its king. Cathal mac Tigernán is the next ruler of the kingdom recorded, but only upon his death in 1059. No details are given beyond that he was killed. His relationship to the rest of the dynasty is uncertain.

Preceded by
Amhalgaidh mac Cathal
King of Maigh Seóla
1051?–1059
Succeeded by
Rúaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh

15. Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Rúaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1061) was King of Iar Connacht.

Áed in Gai Bernaig, King of Connacht from 1046 to 1067, had invaded and conquored Maigh Seóla in 1051, blinding its king. Ruaidhri, king since 1059, and the family rebelled, leading to the battle of Glen Patrick.

The Annals of the Four Masters, sub anno 1061, state that:

Maidhm Glinne Pattraicc ria n-Aodh Ua Conchobhair for Iarthair Connacht, in ro mudhaighith ile im Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh, tigherna Iarthair Connacht, & ro dicendadh é, & ruccadh a ceann co Cruachain Chonnacht iar sraoineadh for mac Aodha mic Ruaidhri/The victory of Gleann-Phadraig was gained by Aedh Ua Conchobhair over the people of West Connaught, where many were slain, together with Ruaidhri. O'Flaithbheartaigh, lord of West Connaught, was beheaded, and his head was carried to Cruachain in Connaught, after the son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, had been defeated.

The following year it was recorded that "Tadhg, son of Aedh Ua Conchobhair, was slain by the son of Aedh, son of Ruaidhri, and the people of West Connaught."

His grandson, Muireadhach mac Aedh (died 1124), was the ancestor of the Mac Aedha (McHugh, Hughes) family of County Galway.

Preceded by
Cathal mac Tigernán
King of Maigh Seóla
1059–1061
Succeeded by
Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh

16. Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1079) was King of Iar Connacht.

Aedh was the third bearer of the surname Ua Flaithbheartaigh to rule over the Muintir Murchada, and apparently the second since their forcible expulsion from Maigh Seola by the Ua Conchobhair in 1051. He was killed in 1079 by Ruaidrí na Saide Buide. For this action, King Toirdelbach Ua Briain of Munster raided Connacht and expelled Ruaidrí.

A notice of the death of his grandson in 1091 says Aedh's father was Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh, who had been killed in the battle of Glen Patrick in 1061.

Preceded by
Rúaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
10611079
Succeeded by
Mac meic Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh

17. Mac meic Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh

 Mac meic Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1091) was King of Iar Connacht.

The chief who died in 1091 is given as mac meic Aed Ua Flaithbheartaigh/son of the son of Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, hence his forename is unknown. No further details are known.

Preceded by
Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1079?–1091
Succeeded by
Flaithbertaigh Ua Flaithbertaigh

18. Flaithbheartaigh Ua Flaithbeartaigh

Flaithbertaigh Ua Flaithbertaigh (died 1098) was King of Iar Connacht.

Flaithbheartaigh was third or fourth chief of the Muintir Murchada since their expulsion from Uí Briúin Seóla by the Ua Conchobair kings of Connacht. The first to bear the surname was Murchadh an Chapail Ua Flaithbheartaigh, King of Uí Briúin Seóla (died 1036).

He was foster-father to the then King of Connacht, Ruaidrí na Saide Buide, who was in turn godfather to Flaithbertaigh's children. In 1092 he subdued Ruaidri in his own house and had him blinded, making himself king in Ruaidri's place. However in 1098, possibly after been dethroned, he was killed by the family of Ruaidri.

19. Tadg mac Ruaidhri Ua Conchobair

Tadg was a senior son of Ruaidrí na Saide Buide, who was deposed in 1092 by Flaithbertaigh Ua Flaithbertaigh. The succession became confused, with O'Hynes of Aidhne been made king by Ua Flaithbertaigh. However, by 1097, Tadg had asscended to the kingship only to be killed by Domnall mac Tigernáin Ua Ruairc

Preceded by
Flaithbertaigh Ua Flaithbertaigh
Kings of Connacht
10951097
Succeeded by
Domnall Ua Ruairc

20. Brian Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Brian Ua Flaithbertaigh, King of Iar Connacht, alive 1117.

The succession of the chiefs of Muintir Murchada after 1098 is uncertain. It seems that as of 1117, Brian was Chief of the Name. In that year, the annals state that

The battle of Leacain was given by Briain, son of Murchadh Ua Flaithbheartaigh, and the son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair, who had the Connaughtmen along with them, to Toirdhealbhach, son of Diarmaid, and the Dal-gCais, and made a slaughter of them in that battle.

Nowhere is it stated that Brian was King, nor is his obituary given in the years ahead. It may be that he was no more than a successful prince of the clan.

Preceded by
Flaithbertaigh Ua Flaithbertaigh
King of Iar Connacht
?–?
Succeeded by
Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh

21. Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1121) was King of Iar Connacht.

According to the Annals of the Four Masters, sub anno 1121:

A hosting by Toirdhealbhach son of Ruaidhrí into Munster, and he burned Ciarraighe Luachra and went from there eastwards through Munster, and burned Ua Caoimh's house on the bank of the Abha Mhór, and his scouts came to Magh Ceithniuil and Druim Fínghin. On that day were killed Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh, king of Iarthar Connacht, and Aodh Ua hEidhin, king of Uí Fhiachrach Aidhne, to avenge the profanation of Mo-Chuda, although Toirdhealbhach made compensation for the plundering. An encampment by Toirdhealbhach son of Ruaidhrí at Magh Biorra during the winter, and he made a settlement between Clann Charthaigh and Síol Briain, and they both submitted to him.

Preceded by
Brian Ua Flaithbertaigh
King of Iar Connacht
after 1117–1121
Succeeded by
Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh

22. Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Conbhobhar Ua Flaithbertaigh (died 1132) was King of Iar Connacht.

The succession of the chiefs of Muintir Murchada after 1098 is uncertain, but Conchobhar seems to have succeeded Muireadhach, who died in 1121. He was Ua Conchobair's governor of Dun Gallimhe.

Mac Carthaigh's Book sub anno 1125 states that:

Flann and Gillariabhach, the two sons of Aineislis Ua hEidhin, were slain by Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh.

An entry of the same date in the Annals of the Four Masters states that this occurred in Dun Gallimhe.

Ua Flaithbheartaigh died in defense of the fort in 1132. Mac Carthaigh's Book state that

A hosting on land by Cormac Mac Carthaigh and the nobles of Leath Mogha into ... and Uí Eachach and Corca Laoighdhe, and the fleet of Leath Mogha [came] by sea to meet them, and they demolished the castle of Bun Gaillmhe, and plundered and burned the town. The defeat of An Cloidhe [was inflicted] on the following day on [the men of] Iarthar Connacht by the same fleet, and Conchobhar Ó Flaithbheartaigh, king of Iarthar Connacht, was killed, with slaughter of his people.

Preceded by
Muireadhach Ua Flaithbheartaigh
Kings of Iar Connacht
1121?–1132
Succeeded by
Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh

23. Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh

 Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1145) was King of Iar Connacht.

The succession of the chiefs of Muintir Murchada after 1098 is uncertain, unless it is that Ruaidhri reigned from then till his death in 1145. However, as of 1117, Brian Ua Flaithbertaigh was Chief of the Name.

The annals simply state that "The men of Munster proceeded with an army into Connaught; and they carried off Ua Ceallaigh, i.e. Tadhg, son of Conchobhar, lord of Ui-Maine, and slew Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh."

Preceded by
Conchobhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
?–1145
Succeeded by
Áedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh?

24. Aedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Áedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh (died 1178) was King of Iar Connacht.

The annals record that Áedh died at Annaghdown, demonstrating that the Muintir Murchada still held some influence east of Lough Corrib into the late 12th century.

In 1185, the annals state "The West of Connaught was burned, as well churches as houses, by Donnell O'Brien and the English." In 1196 "Cathal, the son of Hugh O'Flaherty, was slain by the son of Murtough Midheach."

Áedh appears to have been succeeded by his son Ruaidhri.

Preceded by
Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1145?–1178
Succeeded by
Conchubhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh

25. Conchubhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Conchubhar Ua Flaithbertaigh, King of Iar Connacht, died 1186.

The Annals of Ulster, sub anno 1186, record that "Conchubhar Ua Flaithbertaigh was killed by Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbertaigh, by his own brother, in Ara."

Preceded by
Áedh Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1178?–1186
Succeeded by
Ruadhri Ua Flaithbertaigh

26. Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Ruadhri Ua Flaithbertaigh, King of Iar Connacht, fl. 1186-1197.

Ruaidhri may have succeeded by killing his brother, Conchubhar; the Annals of Ulster, sub anno 1186, record that "Conchubhar Ua Flaithbertaigh was killed by Ruaidhri Ua Flaithbertaigh, by his own brother, in Ara."

Ruadhri was taken prisoner by King Cathal Crobhdearg Ua Conchobair of Connaught in unknown circumstances in 1197. There is no further record of him.

Preceded by
Conchubhar Ua Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1186?–1197?
Succeeded by
Murtough Ua Flaithbertaigh
  

27. Murtough Ua Flaithbheartaigh

Murtough Ua Flaithbertaigh (died 1204) was King of Iar Connacht.

Preceded by
Ruadhri Ua Flaithbertaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1197?–1204
Succeeded by
Rudhraighe Ó Flaithbheartaigh

28. Rudhraighe O Flaithbheartaigh

Rudhraighe Ó Flaithbheartaigh, King of Iar Connacht, fl. 1214.
  • M1207.6. Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, expelled Hugh O'Flaherty, and gave his territory to his own son, Hugh O'Conor.
  • M1214. Brian, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, the son of the Lord of West Connaught, died.
Preceded by
Murtough Ua Flaithbertaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1204?–after 1214
Succeeded by
Áedh Mór Ó Flaithbheartaigh

29. Aedh Mor O Flaithbheartaigh

Áedh Mór Ó Flaithbheartaigh (died 1236) was King of Iar Connacht.

 M1226.7. Donnell, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, was slain by the sons of Murtough O'Flaherty, after they and Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, had attacked and taken the house in which he was.

Preceded by
Murtough Ua Flaithbertaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1204?–1236
Succeeded by
Morogh Ó Flaithbheartaigh

30. Morogh O Flaithbheartaigh

Morogh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, King of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, fl. 1244.

Morogh was the first chief of the clan after their final expulsion from Uí Briúin Seóla. King Áed in Gai Bernaig of Connacht had begun their subjugation in 1051, but it was only with the encastallation of Muintir Murchada under Richard Mor de Burgh that the family were finally driven to the west side of Lough Corrib. The rest of their history as an independent people would be as rulers of Iar Connacht, or as it is now known, Connemara.

Moroghand and his brother, Ruaidhri, his brother may have accompanied Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1233-1256), on an expedition to Wales in 1245 under Henry III. This would have been on Henry III's campaign against Prince Dafydd ap Llywelyn of Gwynedd.

It is not known when Morogh died, so it is not certain if an annals entry of 1248 refers to him. It states "The entire of Conmaicne Mara was plundered by the English. The English went upon an expedition against O'Flaherty, who defeated them, and killed numbers of them." In 1256 Ruaidhri is listed as the Ó Flaithbheartaigh.

Preceded by
Áedh Mór Ó Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
1244
Succeeded by
Ruaidhri Ó Flaithbheartaigh

 

 

31. Ruaidhri O Flaithbheartaigh

Ruaidhri Ó Flaithbheartaigh, King of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, fl. 1244-1273.

Ruaidhri was a brother of the preceding chief, Morogh. Ruaidhri and his brother may have accompanied Felim mac Cathal Crobderg Ua Conchobair (reigned 1233-1256), on an expedition to Wales in 1245 under Henry III.

It is not known when Ruaidhri became chief, so it is not certain if an annals entry of 1248 refers to him. It states "The entire of Conmaicne Mara was plundered by the English. The English went upon an expedition against O'Flaherty, who defeated them, and killed numbers of them." A entry of 1256 - "Mac William Burke set out on a predatory expedition against Rory O'Flaherty; he plundered Gno-More and Gno-Beg, and took possession of all Lough Oirbsion (Lough Corrib)" - leaves no doubt that by then he ruled the area.

It is not known when he ceased to be chief. The annals for 1273 state that "Roderic O'Flaherty was banished from West Connaught", but not by whom, or under what circumstances. James Hardiman says of him:

he found, by experience, that it was safer to rely on the battle-axes of his bold Galloglas (Gallowglass) than on appeals to the sovereign against Anglo-Norman outrage in Ireland. In his time the Joyces, a family of British extraction, settled in the northern part of the territory, by the permission and under the protection of the O'Flaherties.

These years also marked the final eradication of any authority the Ó Flaithbheartaigh had over their original homeland of Uí Briúin Seóla. The rest of their history as an independent people would be as rulers of Iar Connacht, or as it is now known, Connemara. Hardiman goes on to say:

Before the close of the thirteenth century, the O'Flaherties became masters of the entire territory of Iar-Connacht, extending from the western banks of Lough Orbsen, to the shores of the Atlantic. Separated from the rest of the kingdom, in that peninsulated, and then almost inaccessible district, they interfered but little in the external transactions of the province, and are, therefore, but seldom noted in our Annals for the two succeeding centuries.

Preceded by
Morogh Ó Flaithbheartaigh
King of Iar Connacht
?–1273?
Succeeded by
Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh

32. Brian O Flaithbheartaigh

Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh, possible Taoiseach of Iar Connacht

 and Chief of the Name, died 1377.

 Brian may have being Taoiseach, but he is not explictly named as such in his obit.

  • 1377. Walter, son of Sir David Burke; Donnell, son of Farrell, son of the Manach O'Gallagher; Geoffrey O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann-Chathail; Donough, son of William Alainn; O'Carroll, Lord of Ely; Dermot Bacagh Mac Branan, Chief of Corcachlann; Faghtna, son of David O'More; and Brian O'Flaherty, died.
Preceded by
Ruaidhri Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Taoiseach of Iar Connacht
?–1377

Succeeded by
Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh

   *~*~*~*~Taoiseach~and~Tanaiste (Tanist)~*~*~*~*

The words Taoiseach and Tánaiste (the title of the deputy prime minister) are both from the Irish language and of ancient origin. Though the Taoiseach is described in the Constitution of Ireland as "the head of the Government or Prime Minister",[6] its literal translation is "Chieftain" or "Leader".[13] Some historians suggest that in ancient Ireland (where these terms originate), a taoiseach was a minor king, while a tánaiste was a governor placed in a kingdom whose king had been deposed or, more usually, his heir-apparent.  In Scottish Gaelic, tòiseach translates as clan chief and both words originally had similar meaning in the Gaelic languages of Scotland and Ireland. The related Welsh language word tywysog (current meaning "prince" – from tywys, "to lead") appears to have had a similar meaning.[

33. Aedh O Flaithbheartaigh

Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Taoiseach of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, fl. c. 1377?-1407.

Few details appear to be known of him, he being the first of the family to appear in the annals since the time of Ruaidhri Ó Flaithbheartaigh.

He built the church at Annaghdown in 1410 - the monastry of Annaghdown was burned in 1413 - and was succeeded by his son, Domnell.

  • 1384. A meeting, took place between O'Flaherty and O'Malley, but a quarrel arose between them, in which Owen O'Malley, Cormac O'Malley (i.e. Cormac Cruinn), and many others besides these, were slain by the people of O'Flaherty.
  • 1396. Conor, the son of Owen O'Malley, went on an incursion with a ship's crew to West Connaught, and loaded the ship with the riches and prizes taken by that adventure. But all, save one man only, were drowned between Ireland and Aran.
  • 1402. Brian, the son of Donnell O'Flaherty, heir to the lordship of Carn Gegach, died.
  • 1407. Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, died at an advanced age.
Preceded by
Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Taoiseach of Iar Connacht
c.1377?–1407
Succeeded by
Domnell mac Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh

34. Domnell mac Aedh O Flaithbheartaigh

Domnell mac Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Taoiseach of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, died 1410.

Domnell was a son of Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, who built the church at Annaghdown in 1410, but of whom few other particulars appear to be known.

  • 1410. Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, was slain by the sons of Brian O'Flaherty, at a meeting of his own people.
Preceded by
Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Taoiseach of Iar Connacht
1407?–1410
Succeeded by
Murchad mac Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh

35. Murchad mac Brian O Flaithbheartaigh

Murchad mac Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Taoiseach of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, died 1419.

In 1846, James Hardiman stated:

Before the close of the thirteenth century, the O'Flaherties became masters of the entire territory of Iar-Connacht, extending from the western banks of Lough Orbsen, to the shores of the Atlantic. Separated from the rest of the kingdom, in that peninsulated, and then almost inaccessible district, they interfered but little in the external transactions of the province, and are, therefore, but seldom noted in our Annals for the two succeeding centuries.

Murchad was one of the first of the family to feature in the annals in over a hundred years. Even so, it was not until the middle 16th century that the family gained sufficient prominence to become regularly worthy of note in Gaelic annals.

Preceded by
Domnell mac Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Taoiseach of Iar Connacht
1410?–1419
Succeeded by
Gilla Dubh Ó Flaithbheartaigh

36. Gilla Dubh O Flaithbheartaigh

Gilla Dubh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Lord of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, died 1442.

Gilla Dubh was one of the first of the family to feature in the annals in over a hundred years. Even so, it was not until the middle of the 16th century that the family gained sufficient prominence to become regularly worthy of note in Gaelic annals.

He was brother to the previous lord, Murchad mac Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh. His term is obscure; all that is recorded from his era is the following:

1439. Owen O'Flaherty was treacherously slain in his own bed at night, by a farmer of his own people.

Preceded by
Murchad mac Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Lord of Iar Connacht
1419–1442
Succeeded by
Aodh O Flaithbheartaigh

37. Aodh O Flaithbheartaigh

Áodh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Lord of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, died 1538.

Preceded by
Gilla Dubh Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Lord of Iar Connacht
?–1538
Succeeded by
Domnell Crone Ó Flaithbheartaigh

38. Domnell Crone O Flaithbheartaigh

Domnell Crone Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Lord of Iar Connacht and Chief of the Name, died 1560.

Preceded by
Áodh Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Lord of Iar Connacht
1538–1560
Succeeded by
Murrough na dTuadh Ó Flaithbheartaigh

39. Murrough na dTuadh O Flaithbheartaigh

Murrough na dTuadh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, Chief of Iar Connacht, died 1593.

Great-great-great-grandson of Brian na Noinseach, son of Donall na Comthach Ó Flaithbheartaigh (who was in turn a great-great grandson of Ruaidri of Lough Cime). Appointed Chief of the Name by Elizabeth I. Included in the 1585 Composition of Connacht.

  • M1560.7. The Earl of Thomond marched into West Connaught against Murrough-na-dtuath, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Rory O'Flaherty. He passed into the country of the Joyces, by Fuathach, by Bon-an-Bhonnain. The inhabitants of the town of Galway came to defend the ford of Tir-Oilein against him, but he crossed it with the good-will of some, and in despite of others, and marched through the plain of Clanrickard, both when going and returning.
  • M1572.9. A proclamation was issued by the President of the province of Connaught, Sir Edward Phiton, about the festival of St. Patrick, respecting a court to be held at Galway of all those who were under the authority of the Queen, from Limerick to Sligo. At this summons came the Earl of Clanrickard and his sons, Ulick and John, with the chiefs of their people; the descendants of Richard Oge Burke; the Lower Mac William, i.e. John Burke, the son of Oliver, son of John, together with the Lower Burkes; and the Dal-Cais, with their adherents. Upon their arrival before the President in Galway, the two sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, Ulick and John, heard some rumour, on account of which they dreaded the President, and privily fled from the town. When the President heard of this fact, he made prisoners of the chieftains of Clanrickard, and left them in durance in the town; and he himself, with the Earl (the father of the two already referred to, whom he had arrested), proceeded to Athlone, and from thence to Dublin, where he left the Earl, and (then) he himself returned again to Athlone. As soon as the sons of the Earl heard of that affair, they ordered the soldiers and mercenaries of the neighbouring territories to repair to them without delay. That summons was promptly responded to by the Clann-Sweeny of Upper and Lower Connaught, and by the Clann-Donnell Galloglagh (who had many hundreds of Scots along with them). Before however they had time to assemble together, the President took his forces and soldiers with him to Galway, and carried with him the ordnance and rising-out of that town to Achadh-na-n-iubhar, the castle of the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty; and it was Murrough-na-dtuagh, the son of Teige O'Flaherty, that induced him to go on this expedition. Two of the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty were left about i.e. in care of the castle. The President, after having half destroyed the castle, took complete possession of it, and left such part of it as remained undestroyed to Murrough-na-dtuagh O'Flaherty. He then returned to Galway, and passed through Clanrickard and Hy-Many to Athlone, without receiving battle or opposition.

Partners and children

Preceded by
Domnell Crone Ó Flaithbheartaigh
Chief of the Iar Connacht
15601593
Succeeded by

40. Teige O Flaithbheartaigh

Teige Ó Flaithbheartaigh (died 1589) was an Irish rebel and warlord.

 

Background

Teige Ó Flaithbheartaigh was a son, and principal captain of, Murrough na dTuadh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, head of the Eastern Uí Flaithbheartaigh, who had been appointed Chief of Iar Connacht by Elizabeth I. This was contentious as the Western Uí Flaithbheartaigh refused to recognise he had a claim to the office, let alone should have been appointed by an outsider. However, with the support of his family and supporters, Murrough, gained supremacy though relations between the two branches remained tense.

During the Mac an Iarla wars (c.1547–1583), County Galway was reduced to an extremely disturbed state, with much of the county east of Lough Corrib been repeatedly devastated. While the Eastern Uí Flaithbheartaigh's, ruled by Murrough, generally had more cordial relationships with The Tribes of Galway, the situation was used to advantage when possible. During the wars of 1580s, High Sheriff William Óge Martyn sometimes successfully intervened as an interlocuter, but disturbances never fully died out.

Feuds and raids

In 1584, Teige was residing on the island of Ballynahinch, County Galway when it was raided and seized by the descendants of Owen Ó Flaithbheartaigh (namely, Teige, the son of Teige na-Buile ... and the sons of Donnell-an-Chogaidh), claiming that

that that island was their's by right, and that Teige had seized and held it in violation of their right. Be the truth as t might, Teige, after their capture of it, made an irruption upon them, and left not a single head of cattle on their portion of the territory which he did not either kill or carry off with him. They, in return, committed great injuries against Teige, although they had not equal power with him.

In June, Teige pursued the descendants of Owen,

with the crew of a boat to the island of Aran ... he overtook them at the break of day, and found them unprepared, in a state between waking and sleeping, at both sides of the forecastle of their boat. He set them a very hostile example on this strand; and indeed the island was not worth all that was done about it on that day, for Murrough Mac Hugh ... the son of the Seneschal of Clann-Maurice, ... and Murrough Salach, the son of O'Flaherty (Teige), were slain. Many of the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty were also slain, besides these gentlemen. Thus did they remain at war with each other, until they were mutually reconciled by the English in the ensuing autumn, when the island of Baile-na-hinnsi was given to the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty.

The War of 1589

Warfare erupted again in the spring of 1589, this time with Murrough na dTuadh leading the clan and its allies against the Anglo-Irish and their allies. Accompanying him was Teige and another son, Urun, and their first cousin, Donnell mac Rory Ó Flaithbheartaigh. Once again, William Óge Martyn went forth to meet with Murrough, leading a military company. However, by the time he and Murrough met, Teige and his companions had already left, went upon a predatory excursion along the borders of Conmaicne and Machaire-Riabhach, precisely on Easter night.

The places mentioned were along the borders of County Mayo - County Galway, in the lordship of Baron Athenry, the then lord been Edmond I de Bermingham (1540–1612). His account of the events is as follows:

Teig O'Flaherty accompanied by three of his brothers and 500 more came to the borders where I dwell and there did prey and burn sixteen towns. The said Teig accompanied by a hundred more came to my town, (Milltown, County Galway), and there did assault my castle. I being well provided did put them from that purpose. I did kill two of his gentleman and had four of his men hurt and buried. He burned half of my town and all my corn and carried my prey with him. Two bands of soldiers being six miles east of me (Dunmore, County Galway) I did send unto them desiring they mgith make with my guide I having the enemy in sight until we met the soldiers brought them face to face at the gate of Carras[disambiguation needed] in the barony of Kilmaine ... there was a volley of shots from each side ... they came to the push of the pike with great courage until Teig O'Flaherty was slain with eight of his company ... divers others were killed in their flight ...

Remarkably, an account from a Gaelic perspective survives, in the Annals of the Four Masters:

It was at this time that two sons of Murrough of the Battle-axes O'Flaherty, Teige and Urun, and the son of Murrough's brother, i.e. Donnell, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, went upon a predatory excursion along the borders of Conmaicne and Machaire-Riabhach, precisely on Easter night. They had two or three hundred horse-boys on this excursion. They proceeded to take much booty and spoils throughout the country early in the morning of Easter Sunday. The people of the country came from every quarter in pursuit of them.

Unknown to Teige,

On the night before a company or two of soldiers had come, privately and unperceived, to protect the country; and these, upon hearing the loud report of the ordnance, and the clamour of the armed troops on the following day, retired to a narrow pass, which could not be easily shunned or avoided, and there lay in ambush for the Irish host. They saw Teige O'Flaherty approaching in front of the host, and his people in close ranks about him. The soldiers discharged showers of balls at the van of the Irish host, and slew by this volley Teige O'Flaherty, Urun O'Flaherty, and Teige Oge, the son of Teige O'Flaherty, together with a great number of their followers who were about them, of the chiefs of Joyce's country, and the Clann-Donough. Such of the Irish host as were not killed by the first volley went away without panic or fear, and were not further pursued.'

Aftermath

Three days after the killing of Teige, Edmond, another son of Murrough was hung in prison in Galway. The annalist further commented that "were it not that these sons of Murrough of the Battle-axes O'Flaherty fell in the act of plunder and insurrection against the Sovereign of England, their death after this manner would have been a great cause of lamentation."

Teige was survived by at least one child, Brian na Samthach Ó Flaithbheartaigh, who later gained notority of his own.

His home at Ballynahinch, County Galway was later home to descendants of his sometime-antagonist, William Óge Martyn, such as Richard Martin (politician) (d.1834), Thomas Barnwall Martin (d. 1847) and Mary Letitia Martin (d. 1850).

Ruaidhri O Flaithbheartaigh~*~*~The Last Chieftain~*~*

Ruaidhrí Ó Flaithbheartaigh (aka Roderic O Flaherty) (1629 – 1718 or 1716), Irish historian.

He was born in Co Galway and inherited Maigh Cuilinn (Moycullen) Castle and estate.

Ó Flaithbheartaigh was the last de jure Lord of Iar Connacht, and the last recognized chief of the O'Flaherty clan. He lost the greater part of his ancestral estates to Cromwellian confiscations in the 1650s. The remainder was stolen through deception, by his son's father-in-law, Richard Nimble Dick Martin of Ross. Died in poverty at Park, near Bearna.

Uniquely among the Ó Flaithbheartaigh family up to that time, Ruaidhri became a highly regarded historian and collector of Irish manuscripts. His friends and associates included his teacher Dubhaltach MacFhirbhisigh; Daibhidh Ó Duibhgheannáin; Dr. John Lynch; Edward Lluyd; Samuel Moleneaux and his father William.[1] His published works included Ogyia and Iar Connacht.

He is perhaps most often associated with his elaborate history of Ireland, Ogygia, published in 1685 as Ogygia: seu Rerum Hibernicarum Chronologia & etc., in 1793 translated into English by Rev. James Hely, as

"Ogygia, or a Chronological account of Irish Events (collected from Very Ancient Documents faithfully compared with each other & supported by the Genealogical & Chronological Aid of the Sacred and Profane Writings of the Globe"

Ogygia is the island of Calypso, used by O'Flaherty as an allegory for Ireland. Drawing from numerous ancient documents, Ogygia traces Irish history back to the ages of mythology and legend, before the time of Christ. The book credits Milesius as the progenitor of the Goidelic people. O'Flaherty had included in his history what purported to be an essay on the understanding of the ancient Ogham alphabet. Based on the 1390 Auraicept na n-Éces, he stated that each letter was named after a tree, a concept widely accepted in 17th century Ireland.

Ogygia was immediately criticised for its scholarship by Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh (1636–91), Dean of Faculty (1682) at Aberdeen. The arguments about O'Flaherty's continued well into the 18th century, culminating in the 1775 The Ogygia Vindicated by the historian Charles O'Conor, in which he adds explanatory footnotes to the original work.

He was survived by his daughters, and a son, Micheal Ó Flaithbheartaigh.

 *~Crichaireacht cinedach nduchasa Muintiri Murchada~*

Crichaireacht cinedach nduchasa Muintiri Murchada is a tract concerning the medieval territory called Muintir Murchada, located in County Galway, Ireland.

 

Outline

It lists forty place-names and more than seventy tribal, sept or family names and surnames, many still identifiable in the county.

It exists in three recensions preserved in the following three manuscripts:

Family surnames

Surnammes listed include:

  • Ó hAllmhuráin (Halloran)
  • Ó Ceanndubháin (Canavan)
  • Ó Dathlaoich (Daly)
  • Ó Laoí (Lee)
  • Ó Flaithbhertaigh (Flaherty)
  • Mac Giolla Cheallaigh (Kilkenny)
  • Ó Faghartaigh (Faherty)
  • Ó Muirghile (Ó Muraíle)

The text

"204.6: The native family-stocks of Muintir Mhurchadha and their territory here. Ó hAllmhuráin was chieftain of the twenty-four townlands of Clann Fhearghaile, and in truth they belong to the family of Aonghus s. Brian; from Fearghal s. Muireadhach s. Eochaidh s. Eórrán s. Aonghaus s. Brian) is Clann Fhearghaile, i.e., the twenty-four townlands of Clann Fhearghaile, and Uí Fhearghusa of Ros Cam."

"204.7: Mág an Ghamhain (or Meic an Ghamhna) and Mág Catharnaigh are the two chieftains of Meadhraighe and have their own septs under them. (end pp.448-449)"

"240.8: Ó Dathlaoich was the chieftain of Uí Bhruin Ratha (or Ó Duilligh was the chieftain of the fourteen townlands of Uí Bhruin Ratha) and they belonged to the family of Cairbre Airdcheann s. Brian, and [they held] fourteen townlands of all Ui Bhruin Ratha, and belonging to them were Uí Cheinneidigh and Uí Dhuinn and Uí Fhionnog of Cnoc Tuagha and Uí Laideanain (or Laidhghin) of Leacach and Uí Challannain of Ceall Chathghaile (or [Ceall] Chatail] and Uí Cheannabhain, the physicians of Muintir Mhurchadha and Uí Oilealla, and they belong to Tuath na dToibrineadh. (Another book says 'Ui Fhlaithbheartaigh where this says 'Muintir Mhurchadha.')"

"204.9: Ó Laidhigh were princes of Ui Bhriuin Eola together with their septs: Uí Fheichin, Uí Bhalbhain, Uí Dhuibh, Uí Mhadadhain, Meic Giolla Ghannain from Magh Lis Lionn ((a)) a different version: the cavalry chiefs of Ó Flaithbheartaigh) and Uí Cholgan ((b)) from Baile Uí Cholgan: the standard-bearers of Ó Flaithbheartaigh), Meic Fhionnain from Cill Chuanna and Uí Mhaoil Fhabhaill (or Maoil Ampuill) of Domhnach Padraig ((c)) the judges of Ó Flaithbheartaigh) and Uí Chleirchein of Rath Bhuidhbh and Uí Mheallaigh from Ceall na Manach and Ceall na gCaolan."

"204.10: Uí Choraighein were chieftains of Boghaid and Uí Chathasaigh from An Bheitheach and Uí Aingle from Doire Uí Aingle."

"204.11: Ó Faghartaigh king of Dealbhna of Cuil Fhabhair and Muintir Fhathaigh and Fiodh Luaraigh, Ó Domhnaill from An Ardraith (i.e., from Ath, etc., see ahead of you: from Ath Meic Cinn to Loch Oirbsean) and Uí Aodha: they were of equeal rank - carousal chiefs to Ó Flaithbheartaigh."

"204.12: The seed of Aodh of Eanach Duin belonged to the family of Ceallach s. Raghallach s. Uada, i.e., Clann Cheallaigh also. Aodh s. Eochaidh Tiormcharna s. Fearghus first granted Eanach Duin to God and to Breanainn."

References

  • Nollaig Ó Muraíle (2008) A tract on the Connacht territory of Munitir Mhurchada Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, vol. 113.

  

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*


Iar Connacht

The area of Co. Galway, lying between Kilkieran Bay to the west and Lough Corrib to the east, is sometimes described as Iar Connaught on some maps and books, however this is incorrect, as this area was the territory of Dealbhna Thíre Dhá Locha which only ever formed a part of Iar Chonnachta.

Maigh Seola the part of County Galway east of Lough Corrib, stretching from Tuam to Athenry to Maree was included in Iar Chonnachta before the 13th century. After its leading family, the O'Flahertys, were expelled west of Loch Corrib and the Galway (now Corrib) River during the English invasion of Connacht, Maigh Seola was no longer considered to be in Iar Chonnachta.

Since the middle of the 19th century most of Iar Chonnachta has been generally called Connemara largely due to the emerging tourist industry of that time.

The territory of Dealbhna Thíre Dhá Locha / Delbhna Tir Dha Locha covered the eastern half of Iar Chonnachta.

Connemara / Conmhaicne Mara (Conmaicne Mara) covered the western portion of the territory. Joyce Country (the Barony of Ross) covered the north-eastern portion of Iar Chonnachta.

The native rulers of Joyce Country were the Partraighe an tSléibhe whose territory also covered the south of the barony of Carra in County Mayo.

Maigh Seola the plain lying on eastern side of Lough Corrib was also considered to be part of Iar Chonnachta up until the 13th century when the native rulers of Maigh Seola - the O Flahertys / Uí Fhlaithbheartaigh - were ousted from Maigh Seola during the Norman invasion of Connacht in that century.

As they were the most powerful clan in this part of Connacht it seems that the O Flahertys and the earlier kings of Maigh Seola held some sway over all of Iar Chonnacht even before been were forced west of Loch Coirib. The O Flahertys are believed to have had control over Dealbhne Thíre Dhá Locha before leaving Maigh Seola. When the O Flahertys fled west of Lough Corrib, they established complete rule over the native clans there. The O Flahertys remained as lords of Iar Chonnachta until they lost their lands in the upheavals of the mid 17th century.

It is uncertain if the Aran Islands formed part of the territory.

Kings of Maigh Seóla (later Uí Briúin Seóla)

Kings of Iar Connacht

Taoiseach of Iar Connacht

  • Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh, died 1377.
  • Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, c. 1377-1407; built the church at Annaghdown
  • Domnell mac Áedh Ó Flaithbheartaigh - 1410. Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, was slain by the sons of Brian O'Flaherty, at a meeting of his own people.
  • 1417. Rory, the son of Murrough O'Flaherty; Rory, the son of Dermot Duv O'Flaherty, and sixteen others of the O'Flahertys, were drowned in the bay of Umallia.
  • Murchad mac Brian Ó Flaithbheartaigh - 1419. Murchad son of Brian O Flaithbertaig, king of West Connacht, died this year.
  • 1422. Donnell Finn O'Flaherty was slain by the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty.
  • 1439. Owen O'Flaherty was treacherously slain in his own bed at night, by a farmer of his own people.
  • Gilla Dubh Ó Flaithbheartaigh - 1442. O'Flaherty, i.e. Gilladuv, the son of Brian, Lord of West Connaught died.
  • 1503. Teige Boirneach, Murrough and Mahon, two sons of Mahon O'Brien; Conor, the son of Brian, son of Murtough, son of Brian Roe; the son of O'Loughlin, i.e. Conor. the son of Rory, son of Ana; and Murtough, the son of Turlough, son of Murrough, son of Teige; went with Owen, the son of O'Flaherty, into West Connaught, with numerous forces, the same Owen having drawn them thither against his kinsmen (Rory Oge and Donnell of the Boat, two sons of O'Flaherty), who were encamped at Cael-shaile-ruadh, awaiting them. The O'Briens and Owen attacked the camp, and carried away preys and spoils. The sons of O'Flaherty and the people of the country followed in pursuit of them, so that a battle was fought between them, in which the sons of Mahon O'Brien and Owen O'Flaherty were slain by the O'Flahertys.
  • Áodh Ó Flaithbheartaigh, fl. 1538
  • M1542.15. The crew of a long ship came from West Connaught to Tirconnell, to plunder and prey. The place which they put in at was Reachrainn-Muintire-Birn, in Tir-Boghaine. When Turlough, the son of Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine, received intelligence of this, he made an attack upon them, so that none of them escaped to tell the tale of what had happened, except their chief and captain, namely, the son of O'Flaherty, to whom Mac Sweeny granted pardon and protection; and he sent him home safe, outside his protection, to Conmaicne-mara.

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